Writer’s Block Doesn’t Exist – Part 4: Choir of Voices

“Your writing voice is the deepest possible reflection of who you are. The job of your voice is not to seduce or flatter or make well-shaped sentences. In your voice, your readers should be able to hear the contents of your mind, your heart, your soul.”

— Meg Rosoff

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Hark! David Kleinsteuber recounts Chapter the Third!:

“I don’t have the qualities necessary for writing; neither the talent, nor the inner energy, nor the feel for words. As such, I am not a writer, and there’s no point in my trying to write.

Many of us who write or aspire to write have from time to time felt something like this. It’s a not particularly encouraging, blocky kind of thought. So: what to do?

In part 3 of Writer’s Block Doesn’t Exist, our editor Casper tackles talent, practice, and the roles they play in your productivity.

Also: are you a writer, or are you someone who writes?”

Continue reading “Writer’s Block Doesn’t Exist – Part 4: Choir of Voices”

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Writer’s Block Doesn’t Exist – Part 3: Talent and Practice

 

“Writing is really just a matter of writing a lot, writing consistently and having faith that you’ll continue to get better and better. Sometimes, people think that if they don’t display great talent and have some success right away, they won’t succeed. But writing is about struggling through and learning and finding out what it is about writing itself that you really love.”

— Laura Kasischke

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Rapidly recapping essay #2 with David Kleinsteuber:

Stephen King tells you to imagine there is a muse in your basement. A grumpy, cigar-smoking muse with little wings, who only on choice occasions, when it pleases him, doles out that good inspiration-stuff. How do you depend on someone (or something) that seems so inherently fickle in nature—yet on whom you are at the same time so necessarily dependent? How do you relate to him, treat him?

In the second outing of Writer’s Block Doesn’t Exist, Casper Rudolph talks about inspiration: what it is, where to find it if you feel you cannot find any, and how to relate to it in a way that will actually get you writing.

Also pertinent: can you live without caffeine?

Continue reading “Writer’s Block Doesn’t Exist – Part 3: Talent and Practice”

Review: Ghost Stories (2000)

 

Look, I wasn’t planning on doing monthly anime reviews. Truth be told, I kind of hate anime overall. Whether it be shōnen, shōjo, or whatever—I will never be able to get over the standard tropes like “magical girl” transformation sequences, “harems”, or the closely related (not to mention, hypersexualized) fanservice that gushes from every facet of the modern anime industry. It is this repetitive, inbred, formulaic approach many studios stick to which I hate. “Hate” is a word I don’t like to use often either, so when I say that a specific anime series is good, you’d better believe that it might actually be decent.

Continue reading “Review: Ghost Stories (2000)”

Embracing Solitude

Despite what movies like Into the Wild (2007) might like us to believe at times, our Western culture is certainly not a friendly place for lone wolves. Most of us would, for example, feel uncomfortable when sitting by ourselves in a bar or restaurant – and I certainly recall myself wondering at times, when I see someone sitting by themselves. “Don’t you have any friends or loved ones you could be spending time with right now?” And I think everyone can relate to that awkward silence that can – and will – sometimes happen in conversation. “Wait, why is there silence? Am I showing my social incompetence now? What will they think of me?!” Cue social anxiety. Continue reading “Embracing Solitude”

Why Write for a Public?

 

There’s a question that I’ve been putting off, and I can’t really get around it any longer. I’ve been confused about the problem for a while now, and now that a friend’s recently pointed it out again I can’t ignore it any longer with a clear conscience. I feel that my question – and the accompanying feeling – is one that many people share, so I’d like to share my train of thought on this and see if we can get somewhere by following it for a while.

Continue reading “Why Write for a Public?”

2016: A Hipster Odyssey (The End of a Trend)

A last, weary breath of summer cloaks Amsterdam. The September heatwave has even the most zealous sunbathers clinging to their electric fans, and their freezers stuffed with Festini popsicles.

Outside, meandering over roads of angry trams and taxi drivers, a lone man braves the weather with utmost determination. His bike lets out a rusty whine with every push, but mercy is not on the man’s to-do list this day.

Continue reading “2016: A Hipster Odyssey (The End of a Trend)”